SevDelta
givemeinternet:

Fuck your rules son

givemeinternet:

Fuck your rules son

nanavaltiel:

yikes:

ya but this

hnnng

nanavaltiel:

yikes:

ya but this

hnnng

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

riceivore:

My life philosophy.

I feel this is a good philosophy to live your life by :D

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

pegsiclecosplay:

downtothedevilyougo:

nicotinebatch:

averypottermormon:

it’s 2 in the morning and this is hilarious

it is 6 in the evening and it is still hilarious

Hahaha

9:36pm. Still hilarious.

CHIP

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ;_;

Batgirl Volume 3: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4259-6)

“Just for fun…”

Batgirl must face a deadly Talon even after the Court of Owls has been defeated and uses the help of Catwoman to do it. Then, Barbara must conquer her fears of the Joker and face not only him but her brother as well and save Gotham from two deadly psychopaths!
The third volume to Gail Simone’s Batgirl series brings us issues #14-19 of the series along with Batman #17, the Batgirl story from Young Romance #1, and Batgirl Annual #1 all encased in a hardcover edition similar to the previous volumes. The book starts with the Annual and has Batgirl and Catwoman teaming up against remnants of the Court of Owls. Admira Wijaya and Daniel Sampere did the artistry here and did a really good job. The story worked, having both Batgirl and Catwoman act in-character and brought the Court of Owls back into reality and not just a “once-and-done” event. The book then moves into the Joker story with Daniel Sampere doing art this time with Ed Benes. These issues fit very well and it plays into the Batman #17 issue by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo which finishes it off. The Young Romance section written by Ray Fawkes and drawn by Julius Gopez ties into a previous issue but seems a bit pointless overall. The book ends with the remaining Batgirl issues written by Ray Fawkes to start with and Gail returns at issue #19 and Daniel does all the pencil work. These issues deal with Batgirl’s brother and the terror he causes to her family; much like the Joker did a few nights before.
Overall, this was a great read and the Joker story and her brother’s tale led right into each other very well. The Young Romance issue, while nice to be included, seemed pointless overall. The art was nice all around and really fleshed out some of the characters and the minor villain Firebug was designed really neat. Speaking of which, the back of the book contains some neat character drawings as a bonus. Worth the sticker price, definitely.


Overall Rating: 8.5 out of 10

Batgirl Volume 3: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4259-6)

“Just for fun…”

Batgirl must face a deadly Talon even after the Court of Owls has been defeated and uses the help of Catwoman to do it. Then, Barbara must conquer her fears of the Joker and face not only him but her brother as well and save Gotham from two deadly psychopaths!

The third volume to Gail Simone’s Batgirl series brings us issues #14-19 of the series along with Batman #17, the Batgirl story from Young Romance #1, and Batgirl Annual #1 all encased in a hardcover edition similar to the previous volumes. The book starts with the Annual and has Batgirl and Catwoman teaming up against remnants of the Court of Owls. Admira Wijaya and Daniel Sampere did the artistry here and did a really good job. The story worked, having both Batgirl and Catwoman act in-character and brought the Court of Owls back into reality and not just a “once-and-done” event. The book then moves into the Joker story with Daniel Sampere doing art this time with Ed Benes. These issues fit very well and it plays into the Batman #17 issue by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo which finishes it off. The Young Romance section written by Ray Fawkes and drawn by Julius Gopez ties into a previous issue but seems a bit pointless overall. The book ends with the remaining Batgirl issues written by Ray Fawkes to start with and Gail returns at issue #19 and Daniel does all the pencil work. These issues deal with Batgirl’s brother and the terror he causes to her family; much like the Joker did a few nights before.

Overall, this was a great read and the Joker story and her brother’s tale led right into each other very well. The Young Romance issue, while nice to be included, seemed pointless overall. The art was nice all around and really fleshed out some of the characters and the minor villain Firebug was designed really neat. Speaking of which, the back of the book contains some neat character drawings as a bonus. Worth the sticker price, definitely.

Overall Rating: 8.5 out of 10

Firebug

Firebug

Barbara can kick ass even in her night clothes

Barbara can kick ass even in her night clothes

Facing a Talon

Facing a Talon

Another bad guy to drop

Another bad guy to drop

Nightwing Volume 3: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4413-2)

“…Have you ever heard of the “Flying Graysons?’”

Covering issues #13-18 of the Nightwing series, #17 of Batman and part of Young Romance #1, this TPB brings us into Nightwing’s tie-in with the Joker story going on in the Batman title. Grayson must deal with the deadly assassin Lady Shiva, overcome the maniacal, murderous plot of the Joker, and recover from a great loss in the family.
Kyle Higgins is still writing the Nightwing series here (with Tom DeFalco doing the Shiva issues and Andres Guinaldo doing art) and it’s still just as good as it was. The Lady Shiva beginning arc worked really well and she made an interesting villain and it all played right into the Death of the Family plot seamlessly unlike the Court of Owls tie-in. The Joker’s attack had lasting effects and Batman #17 came right after issue #16 of Nightwing and the Young Romance bit followed. The Young Romance issue broke the dark, grim storyline that followed before it but it jumped right back up in Nightwing #17-18 dealing with a tragedy. Scott Snyder wrote the Batman issue with Greg Capullo doing art and, of course, it’s fantastic.
Now, with Young Romance, that bit was written by Kyle Higgins again with art by Sanford Greene. The art seemed a bit cartoonish but the short story worked; it just didn’t work well with placement although they didn’t have a choice. The rest of the book has Eddy Barrows doing art until #17 where Juan Jose Ryp steps in. Now, compared to Eddy, I don’t like his art much at all. The faces look terrible at times. Otherwise, this is a good book to read but has no extras whatsoever so consider that in your purchase.


Overall Rating: 8 out of 10

Nightwing Volume 3: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4413-2)

“…Have you ever heard of the “Flying Graysons?’”

Covering issues #13-18 of the Nightwing series, #17 of Batman and part of Young Romance #1, this TPB brings us into Nightwing’s tie-in with the Joker story going on in the Batman title. Grayson must deal with the deadly assassin Lady Shiva, overcome the maniacal, murderous plot of the Joker, and recover from a great loss in the family.

Kyle Higgins is still writing the Nightwing series here (with Tom DeFalco doing the Shiva issues and Andres Guinaldo doing art) and it’s still just as good as it was. The Lady Shiva beginning arc worked really well and she made an interesting villain and it all played right into the Death of the Family plot seamlessly unlike the Court of Owls tie-in. The Joker’s attack had lasting effects and Batman #17 came right after issue #16 of Nightwing and the Young Romance bit followed. The Young Romance issue broke the dark, grim storyline that followed before it but it jumped right back up in Nightwing #17-18 dealing with a tragedy. Scott Snyder wrote the Batman issue with Greg Capullo doing art and, of course, it’s fantastic.

Now, with Young Romance, that bit was written by Kyle Higgins again with art by Sanford Greene. The art seemed a bit cartoonish but the short story worked; it just didn’t work well with placement although they didn’t have a choice. The rest of the book has Eddy Barrows doing art until #17 where Juan Jose Ryp steps in. Now, compared to Eddy, I don’t like his art much at all. The faces look terrible at times. Otherwise, this is a good book to read but has no extras whatsoever so consider that in your purchase.

Overall Rating: 8 out of 10

Master assassin

Master assassin

Nightwing versus Lady Shiva

Nightwing versus Lady Shiva

Joker: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4235-0)

“A golden age is dawning in Gotham.”

The Joker returns to Gotham city to torture the members of the Bat-Family and show Batman that his only family is the King of Crime! At over 450+ pages, this is a hefty hardcover book. It has the same treatment as the other recent DC hardcovers with an embossed cover and dustjacket. Also like the other hardcovers, it’s unfortunately a glued-binding book. One thing to note is the book is sectioned off, but there are no cover pages (until the end) or breaks in the issues. For example, the two Suicide Squad issues run into each other with no breaks. Also, some of the issues included, like Batman #13 for Harley Quinn, are just snippets instead of the entire issue. An interesting way to format the book but you really have no clue what issues you’re reading unless you have prior knowledge or take guesses from the issue list at the front of the book.
The book is in parts. Part one is Batman’s and contains issues 16-17 of the Detective Comics series to start with. John Layman has writing duties on these issues and Jason Fabok does the majority of the art with Andy Clarke contributing as well. Although Joker-themed, the story doesn’t actually have the Joker in it so it’s not the most intriguing beginning in a book entitled The Joker. However, the art works well while the story is a bit stale. The second part is Catwoman’s tie-in issues #13-14. These work well and we finally see the Joker terrorizing Selena. Ann Nocenti writes with Rafa Sandoval on art. This first view of the Joker is a tad disappointing in the stylized art but the story holds up well and, as expected, the Joker tortures Selena through her memories. The third part is about Harley Quinn and gives us Suicide Squad issues #14-15 with some scenes from Batman #13 interspersed where the Joker arrives at Deadshot’s funeral and pays Harley a visit. This is where the book starts to really take off as we see the classic, evil Joker having no mercy even for a girl madly in love with him. The story has Adam Glass writing alongside Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV along with Fernando Dagnino, Jock, Greg Capullo, and Jonathan Glapion doing the artwork. Everything works well here although there’s a slight art change in one issue but it’s nothing major. The Joker finally takes on his disgusting appearance through the artistry here and the story is a real page-turner with the Joker being so unpredictable.
Part four brings us to Batgirl and a story by Gail Simone. The ending of issue #13, and #14-15 of Batgirl are front-and-center here with art duties mainly by Ed Benes and Daniel Sampere both contributing some of the best art in the book so far. The story, naturally, has Barbara facing her fears of confronting the Joker again after her crippling run-in during the Killing Joke storyline. Now, with her brother on the loose, she has to face the Joker while saving those she loves from his very clutches. It’s a neat story but is very predictable at times. The Joker’s creepy nature and “always one step ahead” game is shown well here. Part five has us at Red Robin and Red Hood covering the endings of Red Hood #13, Teen Titans #14, and Red Hood #14 and interwoven issues of Teen Titans #15-16 and the same issues of Red Hood and the Outlaws. These stories are by Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza and art by Timothy Green II, Brett Booth, Norm Rapmund, and Wayne Faucher primarily. The story is the biggest chunk in the book spanning 2 series but a weak one, at that. A lot of the story revolves around the Teen Titans and Outlaws trying to find their captured leaders and rescue them from the Joker but there’s not a whole lot of Red Robin and Red Hood action, comparatively. Plus, Batgirl is in this story and by her attitude, it seems she hasn’t fought Joker yet despite having read it in part four.
Part six brings Nightwing into the fray with Kyle Higgins and Tom DeFalco writing and Eddy Barrows and Andres Guinaldo doing the art. We hop right back into a fantastic story with the ending of Nightwing #14 and full issues of #15-16. The art retains a creepy, dirty vibe to it and the Joker looks great as does the action sequences. The story is a thriller but it gets a bit silly at times what with Joker doing some things that are outside of reality; even for a comic book but more on that later. Part seven brings us to Damian, the Boy Wonder. Covering issues #15-16 of the Batman and Robin series, this gives us a glimpse at Damian’s struggles at the hands of the Joker. Peter J. Tomasi continues to write the series here with Patrick Gleason penciling. Again, a compelling story with all the characters acting how they should and the Joker giving a chilling performance that’ll keep you flipping pages and art that will keep you dry-heaving from the gross vibe. The Conclusion and Epilogue follow with issue #17 of Batman and #17 of Batman and Robin. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo tag-teamed the Batman issue and made it a killer read and Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason brought the book to a close. Some of the best art in the book in these two parts here and the story, while the ending kind of tapers off, is still definitely worth the read.
Overall, the stories collect here work better than others but there are some flaws. The very fact that the Joker was in all these places almost at once is unbelievable and digging up hundreds of bodies and getting them all set up in no more than a few nights is ridiculous. Batgirl’s multiple appearances in the book lead to timeline confusion and the ending leaves a bit to be desired and seems disconnected what with it missing some key issues of the Batman series. Overall, I still think these big event books would still benefit from an omnibus treatment and include more of the main title. But what you do get here is a great companion book after reading Batman Volume 3.


Overall Rating: 7 out of 10 

Joker: Death of the Family (ISBN 978-1-4012-4235-0)

“A golden age is dawning in Gotham.”

The Joker returns to Gotham city to torture the members of the Bat-Family and show Batman that his only family is the King of Crime! At over 450+ pages, this is a hefty hardcover book. It has the same treatment as the other recent DC hardcovers with an embossed cover and dustjacket. Also like the other hardcovers, it’s unfortunately a glued-binding book. One thing to note is the book is sectioned off, but there are no cover pages (until the end) or breaks in the issues. For example, the two Suicide Squad issues run into each other with no breaks. Also, some of the issues included, like Batman #13 for Harley Quinn, are just snippets instead of the entire issue. An interesting way to format the book but you really have no clue what issues you’re reading unless you have prior knowledge or take guesses from the issue list at the front of the book.

The book is in parts. Part one is Batman’s and contains issues 16-17 of the Detective Comics series to start with. John Layman has writing duties on these issues and Jason Fabok does the majority of the art with Andy Clarke contributing as well. Although Joker-themed, the story doesn’t actually have the Joker in it so it’s not the most intriguing beginning in a book entitled The Joker. However, the art works well while the story is a bit stale. The second part is Catwoman’s tie-in issues #13-14. These work well and we finally see the Joker terrorizing Selena. Ann Nocenti writes with Rafa Sandoval on art. This first view of the Joker is a tad disappointing in the stylized art but the story holds up well and, as expected, the Joker tortures Selena through her memories. The third part is about Harley Quinn and gives us Suicide Squad issues #14-15 with some scenes from Batman #13 interspersed where the Joker arrives at Deadshot’s funeral and pays Harley a visit. This is where the book starts to really take off as we see the classic, evil Joker having no mercy even for a girl madly in love with him. The story has Adam Glass writing alongside Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV along with Fernando Dagnino, Jock, Greg Capullo, and Jonathan Glapion doing the artwork. Everything works well here although there’s a slight art change in one issue but it’s nothing major. The Joker finally takes on his disgusting appearance through the artistry here and the story is a real page-turner with the Joker being so unpredictable.

Part four brings us to Batgirl and a story by Gail Simone. The ending of issue #13, and #14-15 of Batgirl are front-and-center here with art duties mainly by Ed Benes and Daniel Sampere both contributing some of the best art in the book so far. The story, naturally, has Barbara facing her fears of confronting the Joker again after her crippling run-in during the Killing Joke storyline. Now, with her brother on the loose, she has to face the Joker while saving those she loves from his very clutches. It’s a neat story but is very predictable at times. The Joker’s creepy nature and “always one step ahead” game is shown well here. Part five has us at Red Robin and Red Hood covering the endings of Red Hood #13, Teen Titans #14, and Red Hood #14 and interwoven issues of Teen Titans #15-16 and the same issues of Red Hood and the Outlaws. These stories are by Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza and art by Timothy Green II, Brett Booth, Norm Rapmund, and Wayne Faucher primarily. The story is the biggest chunk in the book spanning 2 series but a weak one, at that. A lot of the story revolves around the Teen Titans and Outlaws trying to find their captured leaders and rescue them from the Joker but there’s not a whole lot of Red Robin and Red Hood action, comparatively. Plus, Batgirl is in this story and by her attitude, it seems she hasn’t fought Joker yet despite having read it in part four.

Part six brings Nightwing into the fray with Kyle Higgins and Tom DeFalco writing and Eddy Barrows and Andres Guinaldo doing the art. We hop right back into a fantastic story with the ending of Nightwing #14 and full issues of #15-16. The art retains a creepy, dirty vibe to it and the Joker looks great as does the action sequences. The story is a thriller but it gets a bit silly at times what with Joker doing some things that are outside of reality; even for a comic book but more on that later. Part seven brings us to Damian, the Boy Wonder. Covering issues #15-16 of the Batman and Robin series, this gives us a glimpse at Damian’s struggles at the hands of the Joker. Peter J. Tomasi continues to write the series here with Patrick Gleason penciling. Again, a compelling story with all the characters acting how they should and the Joker giving a chilling performance that’ll keep you flipping pages and art that will keep you dry-heaving from the gross vibe. The Conclusion and Epilogue follow with issue #17 of Batman and #17 of Batman and Robin. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo tag-teamed the Batman issue and made it a killer read and Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason brought the book to a close. Some of the best art in the book in these two parts here and the story, while the ending kind of tapers off, is still definitely worth the read.

Overall, the stories collect here work better than others but there are some flaws. The very fact that the Joker was in all these places almost at once is unbelievable and digging up hundreds of bodies and getting them all set up in no more than a few nights is ridiculous. Batgirl’s multiple appearances in the book lead to timeline confusion and the ending leaves a bit to be desired and seems disconnected what with it missing some key issues of the Batman series. Overall, I still think these big event books would still benefit from an omnibus treatment and include more of the main title. But what you do get here is a great companion book after reading Batman Volume 3.

Overall Rating: 7 out of 10 

No pain

No pain